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  #21  
Old 11-10-2022, 04:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbzep
They can't find a pencil or dowel long enough to reach the top, much less a big enough sheet of sandpaper to wrap around it and rough up the cores.


Yeah, that core surface oxidation can make those composite propellant motors (at least the hobby stuff) hard to light if they have sat for a while, that is, if you don't do what Tim is suggesting and rough up the surface some.

I would hope that on the SLS boosters and the shuttle versions before that there would be some type of thin 'membrane' over the nozzle throat (easily blown away by motor ignition) that would maybe prevent a great deal of that atmospheric exposure, but I dunno....

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  #22  
Old 11-10-2022, 04:36 PM
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For the cost, they need to have engineered a big sanding rod to scuff the cores MANUALLY.
Thaty'll doo.
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  #23  
Old 11-13-2022, 10:42 AM
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In my previous response comparing Minuteman solids with the SLS SRBs, I failed to take into account the fact that the latter are SEGMENTED while the Minutemen motors are not, probably even further explaining, besides the temperature cycles experience by the SLS SRBs and NOT the Minutemen, why the Minutemen have a much longer shelf life.

I found more on why the SLS SRBs do have a shelf life. It's apparently related to the joints:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/202...ter-stacking/2/

The clock doesn’t start until the first field joint is mated, which won’t happen until the next segment, the left aft center, is mated to corresponding left aft booster assembly already on the ML and is related to the function of a J-leg in the insulation at the field joint. “The mate pushes that J-leg together and it has a inhibiting function as a first barrier to impingement on the seal,” Tormoen said. “Northrop Grumman has done a lot of work, and they can talk for days on this, but basically making sure that J-leg has that springing action that it’s expected to have is directly related to the stack life.”

“EGS has been tasked to take some early on measurements of that J-leg to make sure we understand the condition of that J-leg before the mate is completed. As we put these segments together, we’ll have a good understanding of how they’re looking.”

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/wp-...ve-Adhesive.jpg
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  #24  
Old 11-14-2022, 12:48 PM
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Largest communications array deployed yet in low-Earth orbit - the BlueWalker 3 satellite was fully deployed on Nov. 14, 2022

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKFurE77x3M

Deployed in the lab:

https://ast-science.com/wp-content/...ns-1024x737.jpg

AST SpaceMobile hits key milestone toward satellite-to-smartphone 5G service
NOV 14 2022

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/14/ast...te-antenna.html

The unfolding of the BlueWalker 3 antenna marks a critical milestone in the company’s development of a global network to provide 5G broadband service directly to smartphones.

AST’s network would consist of a constellation of 168 satellites, with the company saying it will reach global coverage once about 110 are in orbit. BlueWalker 3 represents AST’s second test satellite to date, and it plans to begin deploying its operational BlueBird satellites late next year.

Link for pass predictions. Your location is determined accurately enough from your IP address. It should be VERY bright. 168 in orbit, if that actually happens, will really piss off astronomers:

https://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=53807#results
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  #25  
Old 11-15-2022, 12:36 PM
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Largest communications array deployed yet in low-Earth orbit - the BlueWalker 3 satellite was fully deployed on Nov. 14, 2022

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKFurE77x3M

Deployed in the lab:

https://ast-science.com/wp-content/...ns-1024x737.jpg

AST SpaceMobile hits key milestone toward satellite-to-smartphone 5G service
NOV 14 2022


https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/14/ast...te-antenna.html

The unfolding of the BlueWalker 3 antenna marks a critical milestone in the company’s development of a global network to provide 5G broadband service directly to smartphones.

AST’s network would consist of a constellation of 168 satellites, with the company saying it will reach global coverage once about 110 are in orbit. BlueWalker 3 represents AST’s second test satellite to date, and it plans to begin deploying its operational BlueBird satellites late next year.


Link for predicting passes. Your location is determined accurately enough from your IP address. Should be VERY bright. 168 in orbit, if that actually happens, will really piss off astronomers.

https://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=53807#results

---------------

Boeing Starliner

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3r5IboQT8M

---------------

Success! NASA's tiny CAPSTONE probe arrives at the moon
14 Nov 2022


https://www.space.com/nasa-capstone...at-arrives-moon

---------------

Who else saw this problem coming? Besides the COMPLEX launch/recovery system itself and what would happen to it in a RUD, note the proximity of all of the support equipment (cryo tanks, etc.) and its easy exposure to a RUD or Raptor exhaust propelled debris from the pad.

I think a Super Falcon 9 using 9 Raptor 2s and a Super Falcon Heavy will be a good fallback if Starship flops and doesn't bankrupt SpaceX.

Starship Super Heavy Booster 7 14 engines Static Fire "Problem"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9agV9gEzPBE
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  #26  
Old 11-17-2022, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston2021
Correct on the metric vs imperial mix-up, but wrong spacecraft. The Mars Climate Orbiter was the casualty because it relied on aerobraking at arrival to save propellant weight and enter the proper orbit, but the unit mix-up resulted in it entering much too low into the Mars atmosphere and burning up.

The shut-off of landing rockets too high was the Mars Polar Lander. IIRC, they think that was possibly from the landing sensor detecting the rapidly pulsed "digital" motor firings or the drop of the landing legs as surface contact. However, in a recent video by a knowledgeable and authoritative space geek on YouTube, they're supposedly back to thinking the lander never fully separated from the cruise stage which would then also explain the total failure of another mission on-board - the Deep Space 2 penetrator probes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Space_2

On the other hand, there is Mars Global Surveyor imagery of what may be the MPL crash site and possible parachute:

https://www.space.com/1153-mars-pol...crash-site.html

Anyway, my name is on the CD-ROM on it as it has been on every lander where that was offered including the Huygens Titan lander. That was very little known in the US, but I found out about it somehow:

https://www.esa.int/var/esa/storage...ull_image_2.jpg

BTW, ESA failed to turn on one of the two receivers in Cassini, so half of the images and data from that probe was lost. Also, after launch they discovered that doppler shift caused by the relative motion of Cassini and Huygens would cause loss of frequency lock and tracking by those receivers and the only fix was to alter the approach trajectory and orbit of Cassini which cost it a significant amount of additional propellant.

Yeah, that was a real f-up which should have been caught. Talk about a single point of failure item... Incorrectly installed sensors caused a more spectacular failure with one of my favorite looking launch vehicles, the Proton. The sensors were supposedly keyed to prevent incorrect orientation, but were forced into place:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqW0LEcTAYg

Actually, their use of the test chamber they absolutely needed to test it in a space environment wasn't allowed. It was the same chamber where the NRO optical spysats (basically Hubbles with very fast optics pointed downward) are tested. At least that was their excuse that I read somewhere. The NRO donated a few surplus mirrors to NASA:

2012 National Reconnaissance Office space telescope donation to NASA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_...onation_to_NASA

I'd love to read all of those, but can't find "ISS-capades." I found these:

Dragonfly: NASA And The Crisis Aboard Mir

https://www.amazon.com/Dragonfly-NA...r/dp/0887307833

The Hubble Wars: Astrophysics Meets Astropolitics in the Two-Billion-Dollar Struggle over the Hubble Space Telescope

https://www.amazon.com/Hubble-Wars-...r/dp/0674412559

https://www.amazon.com/ISScapades-C...e/dp/1894959590

https://www.cgpublishing.com/Books/ISScapades.html

There ya go... might have it through your local library or interlibrary loan. Later! OL J R
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  #27  
Old 12-11-2022, 02:17 PM
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Kessler Syndrome: The Space Debris Problem
Nov 2, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fajxaDxmu_4

Stuff in Space

Interactive display of manmade stuff in orbit.

https://sky.rogue.space/

--------------

NASA Loses Contact With Another Spacecraft
DECEMBER 10, 2022

https://scitechdaily.com/nasa-loses...her-spacecraft/

NASA’s Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) team has not been able to make contact with FM06, one of the eight CYGNSS spacecraft, since November 26, 2022. The team is currently still working to acquire a signal and establish a connection. The other seven spacecraft continue to operate normally and have been collecting science measurements since the FM06 anomaly.

Contact with NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) spacecraft was lost on November 25. The spacecraft is equipped with a built-in onboard command loss timer that power cycles (or resets) the spacecraft after contact is lost for eight days. After the power cycle was complete on December 5, the team was still unable to acquire a downlink signal from the spacecraft. Working with the Department of Defense’s Space Surveillance Network, the team has verified that the ICON spacecraft remains intact. Currently, the team is still working to establish a connection.

There is no evidence that the close timing of the two incidents is linked.


Uh-huh. I wonder if the two satellites have identical or similar comm/control systems. I wonder because:

Hack-a-Sat 2023

As our lives become increasingly dependent on technologies that lie deep in space and the commercialization of space accelerates above us… we must do what it takes to secure our universe. In its 3rd year, Hack-A-Sat is designed to inspire the world’s top cybersecurity talent to develop the skills necessary to help reduce vulnerabilities and build more secure space systems.

The United States Air Force and the United States Space Force jointly present Hack-A-Sat, which is open to all cybersecurity researchers who want to up their skills and knowledge of space cybersecurity. This Capture-The-Flag challenge begins with a Qualification Event and culminates in an attack/defend style Final Event.

Over the past two years, the Hack-A-Sat community has learned a lot about hacking in space. We’ve learned to keep our batteries charged, terms like nadir and how to compute quaternions in our sleep. As a result, Hack-A-Sat 3 offers the most realistic space environment yet.

We’re building a global alliance of hackers, researchers and everyday enthusiasts who nerd out on hacking and securing the future of space. Along the way, we’re continuing to make our learnings public, so anyone can catch up, learn and play in our evolving library of resources available here.

Time is of the essence. With so much of our lives dependent on technology in space, we must do what it takes to secure it now. We must Learn. Space. Faster… for the good of the planet and to prepare for Hack-A-Sat 4, which will be the first-ever on-orbit hacking competition. Watch the video to learn more.


https://hackasat.com/

--------------

NASA Artemis II, III MAJOR PLAN PROBLEM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVGRl0GJEUI

--------------

Starship Static Fire Shockwaves & Concrete Problems

https://youtu.be/ZfbmDhYxWWE?t=154

How SpaceX Falcon Heavy saves NASA billions of dollars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pFdNLHBnnw

How SpaceX Mastered Space Suits

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emp8sxbRpSQ

--------------

History of the RS-25 SSME

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1Q05kJocSc

--------------

JPL and the Space Age: Mission to Mars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_sSzn87ljM
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  #28  
Old 12-17-2022, 08:43 AM
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Very detailed article based upon known facts and questions being asked. NASA hasn't said squat by comparison.

"Roscomos was never able to stanch the leak of the external cooling loop, so the leak only stopped when there was no coolant left."

"micrometeoroid debris, which appears to be the most likely explanation... could have caused additional damage"


"Micrometeoroid" debris? Far more likely manmade debris in orbit.

Here’s what we know, and what we don’t, about the damaged Soyuz spacecraft
The biggest concern is the flight computers on board the Soyuz spacecraft.
12/16/2022


https://arstechnica.com/science/202...yuz-spacecraft/

The Truth About Space Debris
2,832,905 views - Apr 26, 2019


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itdYS9XF4a0

Kessler Syndrome: The Space Debris Problem
Nov 2, 2018


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fajxaDxmu_4

Stuff in Space

Interactive display of manmade stuff in orbit.

https://sky.rogue.space/

---------------

Adam Savage Examines the Apollo A5-L Spacesuit

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sCITQhYw6s

---------------

NASA's DART asteroid smash flung 2 million pounds of rock into space
16 Dec 2022


https://www.space.com/dart-asteroid...a-findings-beta

---------------

Dragonfly: A Rotorcraft Lander at Titan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWcrdmmmTeg

Titan Dragonfly lander image for scale. Powered by same nuclear power unit used for MSL rovers:



---------------

Excellent 3D animation with human for scale.

Every spacecraft on Mars - comparison

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER6EO4B7V68

---------------

Launching with cost-plus, landing with fixed-price: the financial underpinnings of a lunar return - December 12, 2022

https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4498/1

NASA’s attempt to return to its ambitious traditions and establish a long-term presence on the Moon kicked off on November 16 with the launch of the Space Launch System (SLS). That launch was the first step in NASA’s Artemis program that should ultimately set the stage for a human mission to Mars. It is not off to a good start.

It has taken 11 years from the start of the SLS development in 2011 to get the rocket to just lift off, six years behind schedule at an estimated $4.1 billion per launch—more than double its target. Paul Martin, NASA’s inspector general, called that cost “unsustainable.” Part of the blame can be attributed to cost-plus contracts, which NASA administrator Bill Nelson called a “plague” and the biggest threat to NASA’s goal of landing humans on the Moon by 2025.

In a cost-plus contract, the government pays a company the development costs plus a percentage fee, creating a perverse incentive. How? The longer the development, the higher the cost. The higher the cost, the greater the fees the company takes home. Which is why Martin told Congress, “We saw that the cost-plus contracts that NASA had been using to develop the combined SLS and Orion system worked to the contractor’s rather than NASA’s advantage.”


---------------

Orion's recovery ship:

USS Portland (LPD-27)
San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock
Commissioned: 14 December 2017

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Portland_(LPD-27)

Lots of closeups. Fried:

Orion Heatshield Aftermath Following Lunar Return | Artemis I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crcxsmXRMDY

---------------

Apollo 11 Landing Animation (with audio including onboard-only audio)
Dec 10, 2022

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuDsX8atSUk
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Last edited by Winston2021 : 12-17-2022 at 10:24 AM.
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  #29  
Old 12-17-2022, 09:38 PM
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Quote:
"micrometeoroid debris, which appears to be the most likely explanation... could have caused additional damage"

"Micrometeoroid" debris? Far more likely manmade debris in orbit.


Incorrect - at ISS altitude the risks from meteoroids and orbital debris are about the same. This is because drag efficiently removes debris at 400 km and lower.

Higher up, at 1000 km altitude, the orbital debris risk is 9x that from meteoroids. So your comment would be correct for a Sun sync satellite.

At the time of the leak, the annual Geminid meteor shower added about 40% to the meteoroid flux. This is why the officials/media are latching on to a meteoroid cause. However, we simply do not know at this time - many possibilities in the fault tree, including a failure of the “quality” Russian hardware.
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  #30  
Old 12-20-2022, 08:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanel
Incorrect - at ISS altitude the risks from meteoroids and orbital debris are about the same. This is because drag efficiently removes debris at 400 km and lower.
I go by the comment by a former ISS resident, Chris Hadfield, in the Kessler Syndrome video I posted talking about how he could actually hear impacts on the station, the previous ISS solar array damage, the need for the ISS to maneuver to miss LARGE manmade objects meaning that there are undoubtedly far more objects too small to track that they can't avoid, the regular damage to the Shuttle orbiter windows which had to be replaced (I would love to see a tile replacement document stating orbital debris impact damage... although the stupid design exposing the tiles to external tank foam probably made that difficult if not impossible), and the slow reduction in orbital altitude of the debris fields in this twelve year old graph. I've seen a better and more current graph that I thought I kept, but can't find it right now:



So, I'll agree to go with "micrometeoroid OR orbital debris" as NASA should have said although I agree with you based upon the transient increase in meteoroid density I didn't take into consideration. Also, agree on the tendency of Russian stuff to leak...

ISS Hole: Solar Array Damage Spied By Astronaut Chris Hadfield
ISS Dodges Cosmic Bullet...Almost
May 2, 2013


https://www.huffpost.com/entry/iss-...field_n_3201642

"The 'bullet' that created the hole in the solar array was probably due to a 1 mm to 2 mm diameter MMOD [micrometeoroids and orbital debris] impact, assuming the hole was on the order of 0.25 inches in diameter," William Jeffs, a NASA spokesperson told SPACE.com in an email. "A 2 mm size MMOD particle is expected to hit somewhere on [the International Space Station] every 6 months or so."

"Fortunately, small particles less than 1 cm pose less of a catastrophic threat, but they do cause surface abrasions and microscopic holes to spacecraft and satellites," NASA officials said. "The greatest challenge is medium-size particles (objects with a diameter between 1 cm to 10 cm), because they are not easily tracked and are large enough to cause catastrophic damage to spacecraft and satellites."

In total, NASA estimates that about 95 percent of all objects in orbit around the Earth are debris and not active satellites.
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Last edited by Winston2021 : 12-20-2022 at 08:37 AM.
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