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  #11  
Old 02-09-2022, 12:06 PM
Scott_650 Scott_650 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerHawk
Is this unmanned craft supposed to go to the moon and/or beyond and back to earth?

According to NASA after the Crew Module completes it’s distant retrograde orbit it’s going to return to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/around...-sls-with-orion
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  #12  
Old 02-09-2022, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by tbzep
And even with this Block 1, they are still ~40 ft shorter and nearly a million pounds lighter. I'm actually surprised at that with those two honking SRB's. I guess a bazillion gallons of hydrogen (over 700,000 iirc) is still a lot lighter than 200,000 gallons of kerosene.

That's a big reason why they used kerosene for Saturn V first stage. Fuel weight isn't as critical for the first stage, and the size rocket needed to carry that much H2 was simply too much (remember what a stretch the size of the Saturn V was at the time - H2 fueled first stage would have made it massively bigger).

SLS has been going on for over a decade in one form or another - with vastly improved technology over what we had in the 1960's - and still hasn't flown. The Saturn V went from concept to taking men around the moon in ~7 years. Oh how the mighty have fallen...
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  #13  
Old 02-09-2022, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerHawk
Is this unmanned craft supposed to go to the moon and/or beyond and back to earth?

This unmanned flight will orbit then return. The next flight is supposed to be manned and will be an elongated version of Apollo 13's profile. It is supposed to take humans farther from earth than ever before.
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  #14  
Old 02-09-2022, 01:45 PM
TigerHawk TigerHawk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbzep
This unmanned flight will orbit then return. The next flight is supposed to be manned and will be an elongated version of Apollo 13's profile. It is supposed to take humans farther from earth than ever before.


Is it the same type of crew module that they launched back in 2014 for the flight test on the Delta-IV Heavy, or is it something totally new/different?
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  #15  
Old 02-09-2022, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerHawk
Is it the same type of crew module that they launched back in 2014 for the flight test on the Delta-IV Heavy, or is it something totally new/different?

Sorta. The current article's structure is supposed to be about 25% lighter than the EFT spacecraft. The EFT didn't have any life support, seats, etc. IIRC. It also didn't have the recently delivered ESA built service module. Instead, the capsule was attached to a boilerplate of the SM, again IIRC. Someone that keeps up with it better than me can chime in.
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  #16  
Old 02-09-2022, 02:54 PM
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No real sense of urgency since the Apollo/Saturn V missions to the moon.
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  #17  
Old 02-09-2022, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbzep
And even with this Block 1, they are still ~40 ft shorter and nearly a million pounds lighter. I'm actually surprised at that with those two honking SRB's. I guess a bazillion gallons of hydrogen (over 700,000 iirc) is still a lot lighter than 200,000 gallons of kerosene.


I won’t do the extended math, but a gallon of liquid hydrogen weighs .59 pounds. A gallon of kerosene weighs 6.82 pounds. So, yeah....

Earl
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  #18  
Old 02-09-2022, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl
I won’t do the extended math, but a gallon of liquid hydrogen weighs .59 pounds.

If they really wanted to save weight they'd store it in its gaseous form!
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  #19  
Old 02-09-2022, 08:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ltvscout
If they really wanted to save weight they'd store it in its gaseous form!


Ooh, yeah! A dirigible airship strapped to each side of the rocket! There’d be a bit of a drag ‘hit’, but the greatly reduced weight should cover for that!!

Earl
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  #20  
Old 02-09-2022, 09:16 PM
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mbauer mbauer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl
Ooh, yeah! A dirigible airship strapped to each side of the rocket! There’d be a bit of a drag ‘hit’, but the greatly reduced weight should cover for that!!

Earl

Not to mention the additional lift of the gas....

Mike
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