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-   -   Evel Knievel's legacy (http://www.oldrocketforum.com/showthread.php?t=9889)

blackshire 03-23-2016 09:39 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Sams
Don't forget Elvis !! He and Evel dressed a lot like with the red-white-blue jump suits.

I had kinda forgotten about that until I took a tour at Graceland a few years ago and saw several of Elvis' costumes on display, many of which could have passed for Evel's outfits.

Doug


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You bring up an interesting social phenomenon. Many Americans like the *idea* of nobility and even royalty, even though not wanting to be ruled over by a royal family--it's a matter of liking the -trappings- of royalty (which include the fine, special clothing and the protocols of public behavior). In many people's minds, Elvis and Evel were a sort of "royalty by deeds" because of their accomplishments in their respective fields (Elvis still is, to many people). Elvis was the "King of Rock 'n Roll," and Evel was the "King of Stunt Men." Also:

Evel Knievel even had a royal scepter, and Elvis may have had one, too. I suppose it's possible that they may have mimicked each other either subconsciously or knowingly (but secretly). Both being southerners who rose from poverty to fame and fortune by their own efforts, I wouldn't be surprised if they admired each other's achievements, even if they never met (which they may have--I don't know). This phenomenon has even "worked in the other direction," so to speak:

The astronauts--especially the original Mercury Seven--were not infrequently compared with knights (due to their public and societal obligations as well as their work). This comparison even moved Queen Elizabeth II to want to confer knighthood upon Alan Shepard (the first American in space, of course), after he commanded the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission. At the time he was on tour in Great Britain, acting (if I recall correctly) in the Royal Shakespeare Theatre group. When she expressed her desire to knight him, an aide told her that he couldn't be knighted because he wasn't a British subject. Instead, they created the status of honorary knighthood, and she made him an honorary knight.

Doug Sams 03-23-2016 05:16 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackshire
Some years ago I had heard (on a TV program about the relatives and descendants of historical figures) that "Super Dave" Osbourne's real name is Bob Einstein, and that he is actually related to Albert Einstein ...
I can't say if Super Dave is related to the Albert Einstein all us rocketeer types know, but his real-life brother is named Albert Einstein (and is also a comic/actor as well). As a result of the ambiguity, he uses the name Albert Brooks. IIRC, he borrowed Mel's surname for his stage name.

Doug

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blackshire 03-23-2016 05:59 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Sams
I can't say if Super Dave is related to the Albert Einstein all us rocketeer types know, but his real-life brother is named Albert Einstein (and is also a comic/actor as well). As a result of the ambiguity, he uses the name Albert Brooks. IIRC, he borrowed Mel's surname for his stage name.

Doug

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It could be that he isn't related to the physicist, because Einstein (like Frankenstein--my brother-in-law Kip's paternal grandfather changed his surname from Frankenstein to Amazon) is probably a fairly common surname. (This reminds me of the late amateur astronomer Patrick Moore's tongue-in-cheek assertion that Shakespeare's plays weren't written by William Shakespeare, but by another man with the same name... :-) )

Shamous 03-23-2016 09:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghrocketman
Good for her !
he may have been King of the 'spectacle' stuntmen, but he was also the KING of all Douchebags.
Too bad that guy he beat up with the bat did not seek ambush-style physical retribution/vengeance upon him. He desesrved a D-Town (Detroit) style BEET-DOWNN.
In any legitimate dictionary an illustration of the word "Rectum" features a picture of this DIRTBAG.

Rectum? Darn near killed him!

dlazarus6660 03-23-2016 11:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamous
Rectum? Darn near killed him!


My brother always say's this.

Where is this from?

ghrocketman 03-24-2016 12:00 AM

It's from some old coot/geezer.

blackshire 03-24-2016 07:11 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dlazarus6660
My brother always say's this.

Where is this from?
I don't know who first uttered it, but the late Neil Rogers (1942 - 2010, see: https://neilrogers.org/ ), a south Florida radio talk show host, had that saying on his cart machine in the studio (recorded by Mitch Lewis, a voice-over artist and occasional fill-in talk host on 610 WIOD in the 1990s, when Rogers worked there; Lewis has done some national radio ads since then). It can be accessed here, on the "Neil Rogers Soundboard" (see: https://neilrogers.org/soundboard/ )--just scroll down to the (alphabetized by name) button labeled "Rectum dam near killed em" (with the second word in that title spelled correctly on his site, of course). There are also many other sound clips, bits, parody songs, and archived shows of Neil's on the site.


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