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  #1  
Old 06-23-2014, 11:27 PM
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Sather Sather is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 120
Default ECOF Events - Kelly Engineering Challenge 2015

This year's Kelly Challenge will be the final. For that, she is planning an encore of all previous events, sort of a "Greatest Hits". Anyone can compete in any or ALL individual events. There will be awards in each of the six divisions with a grand prize awarded to the one who scores the highest total using any combination of events. I am rolling over last year's prize package to make the purse sufficient for the scale of this challenge. A special certificate is being designed for this event. All pre-registered participants get one. Complete your set.

Rules to be collated and released soon, but basically...

1. You can enter each or all of the six events. There will be awards (trophies and prizes) in each division. There will also be a "Grand Master" award for the highest individual flyer's total score from all events combined. i.e. if you enter several divisions, the scores from each will add up to become your combined score. Note - one does not have to win any individual event to become the Grand Master... i.e. an individual with 3 average scores of 40 each will beat someone who won one event with a score of 100.
added - 1st and 2nd runner-ups to the Grand Master also receive trophies.

2. The events will be -

(Original Year) Event (possible points)

- (ECOF 2009) Crayons (40)
- (ECOF 2010) Strap-on Boosters (100)
- (ECOF 2011) Legged Landers (100)
- (ECOF 2012) Upscale (Downscale) Anything Can Fly (60)
- (ECOF 2013) Secret Payload (50)
- (ECOF 2014) Sample Return Mission (Re-launchable rockets) (124)


maximum possible points (474)
NOTE - You can enter separate rockets in each event, but there will be NO cross-referenced entries. i.e. you cannot enter, for example, a crayon rocket with strap-on boosters as BOTH "a crayon" AND "a strap-on booster rocket". (Sorry, Jay) This is to keep scoring manageable, i.e. 1 judging sheet per flight, with event category declared in advance of flight.

3. To level the playing field...

(a) Max scores in each event will be weighted depending on the degree of difficulty of the event. i.e. Legged landers are more involved than Crayons, so will carry a higher possible score.

(b) Previous winners in each event will be further point handicapped. This is intended to reward and thereby encourage new flyers to participate.

Hope to see you all out on the field in 2015. Cheers.

Sather and Kelly
__________________
AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"

Last edited by Sather : 07-12-2015 at 05:00 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-27-2015, 05:42 PM
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Location: Northern Illinois
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Default Expanded Rules - collated and inclusive (part 1)

I know this is a long set of rules, but it includes all six events and some examples at the end, so the rules themselves aren't overly complicated. (And the majority of the text applies only to event 6, the Sample Return Mission.) The most important is to have fun participating. Plenty of opportunities for recognition of the preparations, and the results, of individual efforts involved.

Welcome to the Kelly Engineering Challenge for WOOSH ECOF 2015.
current as of 7 April 2015

There were 6 Kelly’s Challenges from 2009 to 2014. For 2015, ALL previous
challenges will be re-flown.

2009 - Crayons
2010 - Strap-on Boosters
2011 - Legged Landers
2012 - Upscale (Downscale) Anything Can Fly
2013 - Secret Payload
2014 - Sample Return Mission (Re-Launchable Rockets)

These rules apply to every event…
1. All events will run concurrently over the length of the ECOF weekend. Rocketeers
may enter any individual event, or combination of events (including all 6), at their
discretion.
2. Rocket entries must fly at ECOF in 2015, under thrust of allowed propellant (BP,
APCP, or hybrid). Rocketeers unable to attend ECOF may make other
arrangements, i.e. fly under proxy, to participate.
3. Rocketeer must be certified to level of combined motors flown. NAR safety code
applies.
4. This is an “Engineering” challege. Hence, innovations and unique designs are always
encouraged. Family friendly theme mandatory. Remember the judge is a 13 year
old girl.
5. You can make and fly more than one rocket for each event, but only the highest
scoring entry in that event will count for that event. (i.e. you can’t sweep an
individual event.)
6. Only one qualifying flight is allowed per rocket. (While practice flights are allowed,
the qualifying flight must be identified as such in advance.)
7. No “combining” events. While you may make a rocket that includes features from
different events, (i.e. a Crayon Legged-Lander), you must make separate flights in
each event that rocket is entered in, declaring in advance to which event the flight
will apply. This is to keep event scoring manageable. i.e. one judging sheet per
flight.
8. Team entries in individual events are allowed. Team entry scores do not count
toward Grand Master points, however, as it is specifically intended as an individual
award.
9. Scoring will be by the original point system in use at the time of each original event,
modified for weighting of individual event degree of difficulties. i.e. Legged landers
are more involved than Crayons, so will carry a higher possible score.
10. Scoring is specific to each event with one exception. To level the playing field for
new participation, for each rocket that has previously flown and placed (1st, 2nd,
3rd, or Honorable Mention) in any previous Kelly’s Challenge, 3 points will be
deducted from the score for that event, which also carries forward to the cumulative
score used to determine the Grand Master. This penalty applies to specific rockets,
not specific flyers.
11. Awards ceremony will be at 3:00 PM on Sunday. Must be present to claim your
sequenced pull from Prize Box, else you will be bypassed and get a “leftover” prize.

Prizes…
1. All pre-registered participants receive a “Certificate of Participation” AND one pack of
5 minute epoxy, perfect for keeping in your range box for that last minute field
repair. (while supplies last)
3. In addition to eternal bragging rights, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place finisher of EACH
event will receive an engraved trophy (18 total), PLUS one selection from the prize
box, which includes an assortment of over $300 in rocketry stuff, to include...
- Aerotech single use “F” and “G” motors
- 29mm, 38mm, and 54mm Aero Pack motor retention sets (body and cap)
- LOC/Precision 25’ x 9/16” tubular nylon shock cords with sewn end loops.
3. As in previous years, expect a few “Honorable Mention” trophies for those rockets
and/or rocketeers that deserve special recognition.
4. Finally, the flyer with the highest cumulative point total (combined from ALL events)
will win the Kelly’s Challenge Grand Master trophy plus a $100 gift certificate to
Wildman Rocketry. 1st & 2nd runner-ups receive Master trophies plus $50 and $25
certificates, respectively. Note - the Grand Master doesn’t necessarily have to win
ANY individual event, or even enter every event, to gain the highest score... i.e.
four 50’s (200) will beat six 30’s (180).
__________________
AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"

Last edited by Sather : 05-27-2015 at 06:01 PM.
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Old 05-27-2015, 05:45 PM
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Sather Sather is offline
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Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 120
Default complete rules (part 2)

These rules are specific to each event…

Event 1 – Crayon Rockets (2009) - (Degree of Difficulty = 6th)
1. Rocket must be built from or designed to appear as a crayon. i.e. Converted crayon
banks are allowed, etc.
2. Scoring (40 points possible)…
Innovation in Design (10 points)
Quality of Build (10 points)
Quality of Flight (10 points)
Quality of Recovery (10 points)

Event 2 – Strap-on Boosters (2010) - (Degree of Difficulty = 2nd)
1. Strap-on boosters must be functional. (i.e. add thrust going up, separate prior to
apogee, recovery safely)
2. Strap-on boosters must match the central rocket theme (open category... and
intentionally vague. you may fly ANYTHING, as long as the boosters match the
rocket.) i.e. if you fly a pyramid rocket, you would need pyramid boosters. or, if a
Barbie Rocket, you would need Barbie boosters. (although I think you could get
away with Ken boosters.)
3. Scoring (100 points possible)…
10 points for innovation of design (theme, unique design features)
10 points for quality of build (finish, transitions, fin fillets, motor retention)
10 points for quality of flight (stability, altitude, duration)
30 points for boost (powered) function of strap-ons
30 points for post-boost (separation and recovery) function of strap-on boosters
(intended separations, individual recovery system deployments, lack of
damage)
10 points for quality of recovery of central rocket (recovery device deployment,
lack of damage)

Event 3 - Legged Landers (2011) - (Degree of Difficulty = 3rd)
1. The rocket, or a significant portion thereof, must land upright using folding,
deployable landing legs. (i.e. the lunar module.)
2. Legs must be functional. (i.e. must support the landing weight of the lander and keep
it upright on landing)
3. Point deductions for a rocket that landed well but tipped over due to crosswinds will
be at discretion of the judge.
4. Legs must fold or stow for boost, and feature some mechanism to deploy for landing.
(Snitch's can fly, but with a full deduction of pre-flight judging points for innovation
in design and degree of difficulty.)
5. Scoring (100 points possible)…
20 points for innovation of design (theme, unique design features, including legs)
10 points for quality of build (finish, smooth transitions, fin fillets, motor
retention)
20 points for degree of difficulty, specifically reserved for legs (folding function,
deploy function)
20 points for quality of flight (stability, altitude, duration)
30 points for quality of recovery (recovery deployment, lack of damage, lander
stayed upright)

Event 4 - Upscale (Downscale) Anything Can Fly (2012) - (Degree of Difficulty = 4th)
1. The logical progression from the WOOSH sod field event of the same (almost) name,
the gist of which is to take anything other than a rocket, and make it fly.
2. The rocket must feature a larger (or smaller) version of a commonly available nonrocketry
item, hereafter referred to as the prototype. Like the crayon banks we flew
in year one (2009), but it doesn't have to be a crayon.
3. If the prototype item is smaller than 3 feet in any dimension, (i.e. a salt shaker),
then the rocket must be an upscaled version of it. Degree of difficulty points will
include the magnitude of upscale. (The upscale is an engineer's challenge.)
4. If any dimension of the prototype item exceeds 3 feet, (i.e. the Eiffel Tower), then
the rocket must be a downscaled version of it. Degree of difficulty points will include
attention to details of the prototype preserved in the downscale. (The downscale is
a modeler's challenge.)
5. Scoring (60 points possible)…
20 points for innovation of design (theme, unique design features, unusual-ness
of rocket)
10 points for degree of difficulty - includes magnitude of upscale (upscale only),
OR attention to details (downscale only)
10 points for quality of build (finish, smooth transitions, fin fillets, motor
retention, overall structural integrity)
10 points for quality of flight (stability, altitude, duration)
10 points for quality of recovery (recovery device deployment, lack of damage)

Event 5 - Secret Payload (2013) - (Degree of Difficulty = 5th)
1. This event was kicked off (a bit prematurely, I might add) by Elon Musk, who
launched the first 'secret payload' - a wheel of cheese - that rode into space aboard
the company's private Dragon spacecraft during a Dec. 8. 2010 test flight. Elon was
eventually disqualified. While he did not reveal the payload prior to his practice
flight, he did not declare the flight as a qualifying flight, and therefore would be
required to fly it again at ECOF in 2015, under rules 2 and 6.
2. The rocket must fly with a payload. The nature of the payload must be kept secret
until after the flight.
3. The payload may be contained within the payload bay through recovery, or may be
ejected to recover under a separate parachute.
4. The payload will be revealed to the judge following the flight. Do not bribe the judge.
5. You may not launch multiple or crushable items. (i.e. Cheerios, glass, etc...)
6. You may not launch something so small you will not find it. (i.e. small diamonds.)
Large diamonds are allowed and would be an exception to Rule 4.
7. If you lose, or completely demolish your payload, you forfeit all Payload Protection
System points. Conversely, even if the rocket suffers a spectacular failure (cato,
etc.), full points for the Payload Protection System will be awarded if the payload
suffers no damage. (launch escape tower, anyone?)
8. Scoring (50 points possible)…
10 points for Quality of Build (finish, smooth transitions, fin fillets, motor
retention, overall structural integrity)
10 points for Quality of Flight (stability, altitude, duration)
10 points for Quality of Recovery (recovery device deployment, lack of damage to
rocket)
10 points for Uniqueness / Novelty of the Payload (wide open category)
10 points for success of Payload Protection System (survival of and lack of
damage to the payload)

Event 6 - Re-launchable Rockets / Sample Return Mission (2014) - (Degree of Difficulty = 1st)
1. To commemorate our first landing on the moon and subsequent return to Earth, we
will be replicating it on the barren surface of the Richard Bong State Recreation Area
in southeastern Wisconsin.
2. The rocket will fly once, safely land, gather a cheese sample, then launch and land
again, simulating a return to Earth. While the rules seem complicated, they are
actually intuitive when applied in context of a real mission.
3. Everything required to fly a second time, (to include launch guidance but NOT
ignition circuitry, and return motor with igniter, must have flown the first time.
Possible ideas would include a dual-purpose rocket (ala Buck Rogers), dedicated
descent and ascent modules (ala Lunar Module), a sky crane (ala Mars Curiosity),
airbags (Mars Spirit and Opportunity), etc. The descent portion of flight #1 must
have, as did the lunar module, the ability to land upright, and it must necessarily
hold itself upright during relaunch of the ascent stage. Reliability of first landing is
clearly a critical design element.
4. The 2nd flight must also be from the active range. Rocket must be picked up from
the 1st landing site, inspected by the event judge, then RSO’d and launched again,
using the rocket’s onboard (flown) launch pad, in normal sequence by the LCO
utilizing the WOOSH controller.
5. You only have what you flew. Nothing can magically appear during the mission after
the first launch. Things may be removed, however, if their functions are no longer
necessary. See “transition event” simulation in rule #6. Rescue missions may be
flown by an additional rocket to bring forgotten supplies necessary for the safe
return of the mission vehicle. The only penalty for this “rescue flight” is loss of the
6 points for “Spares Kit Bonus”.
__________________
AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"
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Old 05-27-2015, 05:46 PM
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Sather Sather is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 120
Default part 3

(continued from event 6)

6. Simulated events - Other than ejection charges used in normal recovery
deployments, there will be NO pyrotechnics. This is to comply with the NAR Safety
Code, with the added benefit of keeping participation costs down. (Pyrotechnics is
defined as using self-sustained exothermic chemical reactions for the production of
heat, light, gas, smoke and/or sound.)
(a) NASA used a lot of explosive bolts to hold stuff together and separate them in
flight. But not you. Therefore, events that would have been initiated with
explosive bolts must be simulated. However, to simulate the ability to have
engineered the equivalent, fliers are allowed to simulate a maximum of three
“transition events” between flights. i.e., you can jettison a payload shroud and/
or remove a parachute recovery harness from the descent / landing stage if it
would otherwise interfere with the subsequent 2nd launch. Or, if you are using a
the same recovery harness, repacking it would also simulate jettisoning the old.
These events “cost” 3 points each, and must be declared pre-flight, i.e. you can’t
re-purpose the function of the engineering you have intended. However, while
the function of the simulated event must be declared in advance, the point
deduction is not made until the simulated event is accomplished. Therefore, it is
possible to use a simulated pyrotechnic device as a backup to a mechanical
feature that might fail. For example - you have designed a protective clamshell
that should mechanically open on landing. A simulated pyro charge is used as a
backup and declared preflight. If the mechanical device functions as designed,
no pyro device is needed so no points are deducted. If the mechanical device
jams, (picture the Agena Target Vehicle’s gaping alligator mouth), you “blow
open” the shroud with simulated charges and take the three point penalty.
(b) Igniters... the igniter for your second flight must be flown on the first flight,
but isn’t required to be installed in the ascent motor until back on the range for
your 2nd flight. No penalty for complying with this requirement or accomplishing
this event.
(c) Cheese sample scooping... per Rule #4, the rocket must be inspected by the
judge between flights. That is when we plan to distribute the cheese samples, so
no need to add a remote controlled arm or scoop to pick it up. You can just add
it to a suitable payload bay, tape it to the shock cord, etc. The cheese must be
safely recovered after flight #2. We recommend NOT eating the Cheese, as it
was brought back from AMS well in advance of the event and we cannot
guarantee its freshness.
7. Design and operation of the vehicle will be judged prefight. Unique features and
should be described, and simulated events must be declared in advance. No secrets
going in.
8. Only one qualifying series of flights is allowed per rocket. While practice flights are
allowed, the qualifying 1st flight must be identified as such in advance, and the 2nd
flight must follow in sequence. i.e. no “in-between” flights under this mission are
allowed.
9. Some effects are under our control, some are not. We can adapt, i.e. a damaged
rocket may still result in a successful mission. This is a unique challenge, and all
results will be treated as if they occured during an actual spaceflight mission, with
due respect to those failures and successes. Some examples have been listed and
are available as an attachment to these rules. Actual flights may demonstrate
combinations of these.
10. Scoring (124 points possible). Remember, the points will be applied in context of a
real mission.
pre-flight points -
10 points for “Innovation in Design for Flight #1” - unique design features, incl.
landing mechanisms
10 points for “Innovation in Design for Flight #2” - unique design features, incl.
launch guidance mechanisms
10 points for “Quality of Build” (finish, smooth transitions, fillets, motor
retention, structural integrity)
10 “Bank Points” that you can spend - everybody gets 10 to start with, minus
what you used for simulated pyro events
1st flight -
10 points for “Quality of Flight #1” (stability, altitude, duration)
10 points for “Quality of Recovery #1” (recovery device deployment, lack of
damage to rocket and/or pad / platform)
10 points for “Re-launchability” (post-flight repair possible if needed, ability to
re-launch)
2nd flight -
10 points for “Quality of Flight #2” (stability, altitude, duration)
10 points for “Quality of Recovery #2” (recovery device deployment, lack of
damage to rocket)
10 points for “Mission Success” (survival of and return of cheese sample)
Post-flight adjustments -
Bank points - 3 points deducted for every simulated pyro event actually used
Bonus points added for each of the following -
3 bonus points - “On-Range Bonus” - you land on the range and do not
need to be moved other than to reach a set of igniter leads. must be
witnessed by neutral party.
3 bonus points - “Landing Bonus” - you land upright. must be witnessed by
neutral party.
6 bonus points - “Spares Kit Bonus” - you flew adequate supplies to make
suitable repairs between flights, whether or not they were used. shown to
judge in preflight judging. There is no penalty for use of spares between
flights. Also, spares left behind from your return flight may be made
available to other return flights in the event they become “stranded”.
6 bonus points for duration of 1st flight of at least 20 seconds. (i.e. no 1/4A,
lowest flight, closest to the pad, Snitch, etc...)
6 bonus points for duration of 2nd flight of at least 30 seconds. (i.e. no 1/4A,
lowest flight, closest to the pad, Snitch, etc...)
Expanded explanations & examples for Sample Return Mission
__________________
AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"
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Old 05-27-2015, 05:47 PM
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Sather Sather is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 120
Default part 4

examples in actual operation, applicable to event 6...

(a) - someone stepped on your rocket in the prep area. Bummer. (NOAA-19, Sep 2003)
- During final servicing by Lockheed-Martin, engineers failed to check if the weather
satellite was bolted down before moving it, and accidentally dropped it. Whoops!
Repairs to the satellite cost $135 million, and it was eventually launched in Feb
2009 = no point loss, variable self-imposed time and monetary penalties.
(b) - launch anomaly resulting in loss of 1st launch vehicle, but with recovery of descent
stage and 2nd launch vehicle, i.e. you lose the launch vehicle but recover the
descent stage. The descent vehicle must be recovered, and the ascent vehicle must
make the 2nd launch and be recovered, along with the cheese. In the Apollo
program, the huge Saturn V lofted the Command, Service, and Lunar Modules to
the moon. Only the lunar module made the descent to the surface, and only half of
that left the surface. The Saturn V was not recovered. So, if the launch vehicle is
damaged, you may lose some points in “Quality of Flight (or Recovery) #1”, but if
separate and (1) you recover the descent vehicle and (2) are able to refly it = no
further point deduction. Mission continues.
(c) - launch anomaly resulting in loss of descent stage. (Orbital Carbon Observatory,
Feb, 2009) - A payload fairing is a clamshell-shaped cover that protects a payload
during early flight, and they are always jettisoned as soon as possible after a rocket
has climbed high enough that heating from air friction will not damage the payload.
The OCO fairing failed to separate after second stage ignition. The extra mass of
the fairing was not a significant factor during the flight of the larger lower stages,
but it kept the small third stage from adding enough velocity to reach orbit, so the
resulting sub-orbital ballistic path put the payload into the ocean near Antarctica, 17
minutes after liftoff = loss of all “Quality of Flight” points, as well as all subsequent
categories.
(d) - launch anomaly, vehicle remains fully functional. (Apollo 12, Nov 1969) - was
struck by lightning (twice, at 36 and 52 seconds) during launch, knocking electrical
systems offline. Power was restored about four minutes later. The astronauts spent
additional time in earth orbit to make sure the spacecraft was functional before
firing their S-IVB third stage engine and departing for the moon = no point
deduction.
(e) - your recovery system fails resulting in complete loss of vehicle. (Mars Climate
Orbiter, Dec 1998) - In one of the all time great engineering gaffs, NASA
subcontractor Lockheed Martin created thruster software that used Imperial units,
not the metric units used by NASA. NASA did not know this, never converted from
pounds to newtons, and the probe hit the Martian atmosphere and burned up = loss
of points under “Quality of Recovery” of the applicable flight, and all subsequent
categories.
(f) - you literally lose your rocket. (Mars Polar Lander, Jan 1999) - on December 3,
1999, after the descent phase was expected to be complete, the lander failed to
reestablish communication with Earth. (Beagle 2, Jun 2003) - All contact with it
was lost in Dec 2003, upon its separation from the Mars Express orbiter six days
before the Beagle’s scheduled entry into the atmosphere. = start looking. You have
until Sunday to find it, else loss of points under “Quality of Recovery” of the
applicable flight, and all subsequent categories.
(g) - partial recovery failure with no damage to descent vehicle. (Apollo 15, Aug 1971) -
During descent, the three main parachutes opened successfully. However, when the
remaining reaction control system fuel was jettisoned, one parachute was damaged
by the discarded fuel causing it to collapse. The Apollo 15 and its crew still splashed
down safely, at a slightly higher than normal velocity, on the two remaining main
parachutes. = mission may continue, no point loss.
(h) - partial recovery failure with non-repairable damage to pad / platform but not
ascent vehicle. You land hard and break a leg on the lander, but the ascent rocket
section is still deemed flyable. (Apollo program, never utilized) - We are going to
treat that as a rejected landing with an abort to orbit. If a fault occurred during an
attempted moon landing, the astronauts had the option of firing the ascent engine
and returning to the Command Module in lunar orbit, and subsequently to Earth.
Simulating this, you may remove your ascent stage from the lander’s launch
platform, return it to the range, and re-launch it from any appropriate WOOSH pad.
Since the rocket flew twice, this will in itself not generate a point deduction in any
categories other than ““Mission Success”, since when you waived off you didn’t
acquire any cheese. There may be, at the discretion of the judge, a points penalty
for “Quality of Recovery #1”, if that is what damaged your lander. But you were
fully “re-launchable” and your astronauts returned safely. Congratulations!
(i) - partial recovery failure with repairable damage to ascent vehicle or pad / platform.
You only have what you can carry. Nothing can be added to the mission after the
first launch. But you can make repairs using what you happen to have brought
along in the lander, with no penalty. In fact, everybody can earn a couple bonus
points for having flown a representative sample of things you may need to make the
trip home. Think of that scene in Apollo 13: “We need to make this… fit into this…
using this.” If you break a fin on landing #1, you can repair it only if you flew the
tape or adhesive you need to do so. If your second launch attempt burns the
igniter, hope you flew a spare. In the actual operation of Apollo 11 (Jul 1969), while
moving within the cabin, Buzz Aldrin accidentally broke a main engine arming circuit
breaker. There was concern this would prevent firing the engine, stranding them on
the Moon. They used a felt-tip pen to activate the switch.
(j) - partial recovery failure with non-repairable damage to ascent vehicle and/or loss of
ability to re-launch. (Apollo program, never utilized) - Your lander is stranded.
President Nixon had a prepared speech for such an occasion during the Apollo
program. Think about what you may want to say. = full point deductions in all
categories of 2nd flight.
(k) - landing site suitability, example #1. (Apollo program, all) Apollo had pilots, you
don’t. Neil Armstrong famously overflew a field of boulders to find a better place to
land. Your first flight hangs in a tree, or tips over on landing due to wind. This does
not mean the end of the mission. Since, assuming unlimited funds and training and
given the ability to do so, you would have picked a better area and safely landed
upright in a flat spot, AND under rule 4b you must re-launch from the range, you
will be allowed to move your rocket back to the range, and upright it back to its legs
(if so equipped) = with no point deduction.
(l) - landing site suitability, example #2. Your intended landing site turned out to be a
“water world” and your mission landed in the lake. Hey, the Huygens probe was
designed to float upright, why didn’t you think of that? (Soyuz 23, Oct 1976) The
landing capsule broke through the surface of a frozen lake and was dragged
underwater by its parachute. The crew was saved after a very difficult rescue
operation. = no point deduction, but you get wet. However, any water damage to
your ascent stage may result in penalties under example (j). And you still got wet.
__________________
AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"
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Old 06-08-2015, 05:58 PM
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Location: Northern Illinois
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Under Rule 3(b) above, previous recognized event winners (win / place / show / honorable mention) will have a small point deduction applied to the event in which they previously excelled. For reference, here is a list of previously trophied or medaled flyers and the number of times they have been recognized as such. (Jay stands alone as the only rocketeer to place in every year of the Kelly Challenge!)
Jay Rietz = 6
Walt Evans = 5
Scott Goebel = 4
Sather Ranum = 4
Joe Kasel = 3
Marc Stevens = 3
Ben Walbaum = 2
Girl Scout Troop #1034 = 1
Jason Griffen = 1
Mark Hackler = 1
Tim Lehr = 1
John Mackay = 1
Rex Reynolds = 1
Chad Rogers = 1
Bill Rupp = 1
Jeremy Westergaard = 1
Russ Westergaard = 1
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AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:01 PM
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Sather Sather is offline
Entropy Demonstrator
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 120
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T minus 11 days.
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AP used in 2010: 28,044 Ns (36.9% O)
AP used in 2011: 43,488 Ns (6.2% P)
Highest altitude achieved: 21,981' AGL

"Gravity is a cruel and unpredictable mistress"
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