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BEC
02-12-2010, 03:23 PM
I'm sitting in the cafe at the Museum of Flight in Seattle. I'm a member, so I come here once in ahwile, but today, embedded in the history of rockets and space flight section I saw something either just added or that I've just missed before - a display of three early model rockets from "the G. Harry Stine Archive" including a Rock-A-Chute Mark II that he built from oen of Mr. Carlisle's kits, plus an Aerobee Hi from a Model Missiles kit and a prototype of a larger scale model of an Aerobee 300 that didn't go into production. Also shown is a box of Rock-a-Chute motors, a Model Missiles launch tower and a writeup about G. Harry and model rocketry in contrast to amateur rocketry.

This exhibit is right beside some things from Homer Hickam's amateur rocketry experiments, both actual stuff and a couple of props from October Sky as well as a description of his various careers.

I feel silly that I didn't bring a camera with me so I could post a picture or three. The camera in my cell phone doesn't work any more either. Maybe I can capture an image with the webcam on my little Acer netbook (that I'm typing on right now) when I go back over there......

This of course is just a tiny tiny portion of what is on display here (see www.museumofflight.org for the museum's site) but I was rather gratified to see it.

Added:

Here are some pictures taken with the 0.3 MP webcam in my AspireOne. Really awkward aiming, let me tell you, with the cam at the top of the display bezel. But....better than nothing.

BEC
02-12-2010, 10:09 PM
One more picture....

evo666
02-14-2010, 08:34 AM
Good stuff BEC. Last time I was there all i wanted to see was the SR-71 ;)

Green Dragon
02-14-2010, 12:54 PM
cool beans :)

if you go back, with camera - please do get some good photos of the launch tower.

looks very much like the one I sold 'Gus' a while back - origin still unconfirmed, but appears to have similar type.r guides inside.

interesting displays.

~ AL

BEC
02-14-2010, 01:56 PM
OK.

There are sheet metal "vanes" inside the tower that would support and guide a rocket of a particular body diameter as it climbed out of the tower. A rather inflexible arrangement but no rod whip :).

dnb9530
02-20-2010, 06:04 PM
The Stine and Hickam exhibits opened with the gala for the X-15. That was two years ago (or maybe 3). Bill and Barbara Stine were present for the event. The keynote speaker for the evening was Neil Armstrong - three of the four remaining X-15 pilots were here.
Doug 9338

BEC
02-20-2010, 10:31 PM
Gee, I'm sorry I missed it. I guess I need to pay more attention to my MoF newsletters.....Thanks for the info.

billspad
02-21-2010, 08:10 AM
cool beans :)

if you go back, with camera - please do get some good photos of the launch tower.

looks very much like the one I sold 'Gus' a while back - origin still unconfirmed, but appears to have similar type.r guides inside.

interesting displays.

~ AL


In case he doesn't get back for a while or they won't let him climb up and take a photo from the top down. Here's a picture of that type of tower. There were several spacers on each side to change the body tube size.

BEC
02-21-2010, 09:08 AM
I should be able to take a top-down shot since the tower is essentially at floor level - but since it's in a display case the resulting picture probably wouldn't be as good as yours. That is definitely another example of the same type of tower.

But it may be awhile before I get back up there.

o1d_dude
02-21-2010, 03:03 PM
It's been a number of years since I was up to visit the relatives and the Museum of Flight.

Thanks for the memories.

dnb9530
02-21-2010, 04:16 PM
For the sake of completeness, the museum doesn't have an SR-71. What it has is a CIA A-12 that was modified to carry the D-21 drone. After the accident the program was cancelled. You can find pics of the D21 under the wings of B-52s during the Viet Nam war. They boosted them to supersonic speeds to start the ramjet using a solid rocket motor.